Arts and Technology

L E S L E Y * G A R T S * 6 0 0 8

SYLLABUS CONTENTS

What Is Great Teaching?

by Tom Snyder

If you ask 40 students from a liberal, east-coast graduate school of education to write one page about their most influential teacher, will the results be predictable? I did it, and they weren’t.

I drew a ten-foot line on the blackboard that was to represent a continuum of teaching styles described by these one-page papers. After reading a paper aloud, we would attach that paper somewhere along the line, the left end reserved for the most open-ended teaching styles: student-centered, discovery-learning based, teacher as copilot in the voyage of learning. The right end of the line would be reserved for the most teacher-driven, autocratic, personality-and charisma-based teaching. After reading each page aloud, I then “walked the line", asking the class to vote for the most appropriate place to tape the writing to the board. So where were all the papers clustered when we had finished? Please guess before reading on. . . .

This particular group of forty papers was distributed as smooth as silk over ten feet of imaginable styles. On the left were teachers from the 1970s who let their students create their own collages/films/newspapers/solar collectors/geodesic this and thats. The right end of the line held accounts of passionate teachers who said, “give yourself fully to me for a semester or two and in return I will show you how to perceive a still-life, how to understand the flux of history, how Shakespeare can be felt deep in the heart.” Across the middle of the line were spread all of the other heroes of teaching.

You could say that this particular continuum shows us that there is no one particular winning style. Or you could reasonably claim that this continuum produces no new understanding. More interesting would be a spectrum that crowded the cherished memories of students on one end. What would that spectrum be, we asked ourselves. Try a continuum that sails from passionate to indifferent, or from willing to connect with students to personally inaccessible. There, we thought, you will get agreement.

Reading the literature from the world of school technologies over the last decade, one gets the impression that the true heroic work of microprocessors will be to relieve us from the tyranny of teacher-centered learning. If this happens, we will be disappointing at least half of our students. The achievements of educational progressivism have been many. I, for one, owe my career to them. The failed aspects of progressivism have emasculated, diminished, and subverted the intuitive efforts of many teachers.

In England, recent studies of progressive classrooms have revealed teachers who spend far too much time apologizing for their intrusions. Don’t tell the kids the answers. OK. Don’t even tell the kids the questions. OK. As a matter of fact, could you move out of the frame, please? Sure, if that’s what is best. . .

Passion, relationships, fascination, humanity, caring: some teachers will demonstrate the power of these from afar and some from on high. In the coming century we shall discover, and I only hope it does not take too long, that technology’s job is to support their choice.

Rentetion Rates by Instruction Style

“As a student I learned mainly for myself. When I did share information, it was usually with the teacher, who already knew it. As a teacher, on the other hand, I was responsible for conveying concepts, content, and skills that were new to my audience. I had to think about how others would understand the material. The act of creating that explanation, of putting the content into my own words, increased my own understanding.”

- David Dockterman, Tom Snyder Productions

COURSE BLACKBOARD SITE

COURSE WIKI

DATES

TIMES

INSTRUCTOR

LOCATION

SITE COORDINATOR

QUOTES

Instructional strategies that employ teaching others
result in the best learning retention rate.

“To teach is to learn”
- Japanese Proverb

“Tell me and I'll forget; show me and I may remember; involve me and I'll understand.”
- Chinese Proverb

"When the student is read the teacher will appear"
- Buddhist Proverb

“The research on teacher quality to-date shows that teacher knowledge and mastery of subject matter, and cognitive and verbal ability can positively impact student achievement” (Paige, R, 2003).
Paige, R (2003) Meeting the Highly Qualified Teacher Challenge: The Secretary’s Annual Report on Teacher Quality. US Department of Education. Office of Planning and Innovation.

The best teachers constantly monitor what is happening to students as they set about learning and investigate when things do not proceed as planned or expected. They also enquire their own practice so they might get better at ensuring that their students learn successfully.
Demos 2004. About learning, Report of the Learning Working Group, Demos, London www.demos.co.uk

In an era when students design web sites for projects and integrate video, graphics, and animation into their presentations, art is fast becoming the new literacy of our times…students must think and communicate as designers and artists. The age of art has arrived, leaving behind the text-centric world that has guided us for so long… Art has become the Fourth R.
-Jason Ohler

Everyone needs to talk, to hear and to play with language, to exercise the mind and emotions and tongue together. Out of this spirited speech can come meaningful, flavorful language, worth the time and effort of writing and rewriting, phrasing, rehearsing, and reading aloud.
Wolsch, R.A. and Wolsch, L.A.C

We are “digital immigrants” (Alan November) while our students are native speakers. It will take twice as much work on our parts to develop fluency. Be patient with yourself!

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course will engage students in arts-based technology using a variety of software programs. Students will gain an understanding of technology and its many applications across the disciplines and in the world around them. Working collaboratively and/or independently, students will use technology in a caring, stimulating, safe, and creative learning environment.

COURSE OBJECTIVES

COURSE BENCHMARKS

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

READINGS

Assigned articles are available online. The readings address both practical and theoretical topics. In addition, the text, Arts with the Brain In Mind, by Eric Jensen, is highly recommended.

ASSIGNMENTS AND POINT SCALE

In-Class Labs 30% Due Sunday, Weekend 2
Digital Imagery Infused Lessons Presentation 30% Due Saturday, Weekend 2
Final Project Option 20% Due 30 days from last class
Attendance, Punctuality and Positive, Active Participation 20%  

GRADING OVERVIEW

Projects will be graded on their completeness, originality, creativity, interdisciplinary approach, and appropriate use of technology. Written portions of projects must be word-processed, thoroughly proofread, and where appropriate, APA guidelines should be followed. Late work will be penalized 5% per day without prior notice and approval by the instructor. Sent work must be postmarked 30 days from the last course date and be mailed to the instructor’s home address. Please enclose a SASE if you want work returned. All feedback will be given via email within two weeks of the final due date. If you do not receive an email with feedback and final grades, do not hesitate to email the instructor.

GRADING STANDARDS (Please See Rubrics)

A Work is superior in all aspects and exceeds the guidelines in one or more ways. In-class participation
reflects a very high degree of involvement in all aspects of the discussions, activities and lab projects.
B Work is satisfactory and all requirements have been met. In-class participation reflects satisfactory
involvement in most aspects of the discussions, activities and lab projects.
C Submitted work fails to meet the requirements. Participation in activities fails to reflect involvement,
commitment or significant growth on the part of the student.
D/F Student work falls below college level expectations.

ELIGIBILITY FOR GRADE RECONSIDERATION OR INCOMPLETE

There are times when students, for reasons beyond their control, cannot complete the assignments, or cannot attend the entire class. It is the responsibility of any student having difficulty completing course work to obtain an Incomplete Course Contract from the Registrar’s Office. In the absence of a negotiated contract,incomplete work will result in a failing grade.Keep an electronic copy of each project for your own reference as you may have the option to revise your project in response to the instructor’s comments. If your project is not at passing graduate level, your project may be returned, and you may resubmit it for a grade reconsideration, not to exceed the minimum passing grade. Projects judged to be incomplete maybe revised and resubmitted as well.

PRE-WEEKENDS HOMEWORK

TO DO BEFORE WEEKEND 1

COURSE SCHEDULE

WEEKEND 1 - SATURDAY 8AM - 5PM

WEEKEND 1 - SUNDAY 8AM - 5PM

MID-WEEKENDS HOMEWORK

TO DO BEFORE WEEKEND 2

WEEKEND 2 - SATURDAY 8AM - 5PM

WEEKEND 2 - SUNDAY 8AM - 5PM

POST-WEEKENDS HOMEWORK

TO DO AFTER WEEKEND 2

RUBRICS

COURSE RESOURCES

ARTICLES

WEB 2.0 TOOLS (ONLINE TOOLS)

OPEN SOURCE and/or FREE PROGRAMS FOR YOUR COMPUTER

ONLINE LEARNING RESOURCES

ONLINE ARTICLES LINKED

PRINT AND ONLINE REOURCES REFERENCED

Allen, D. (2001). Getting Things Done. New York, NY: Penguin Group.

Armstrong, T. (2000). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Burmark, L. (2002). Visual Literacy, Learn to See, See to Learn. Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Chen, M., Armstrong, S. (2002). Edutopia: Success Stories for Learning in the Digital
Age. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass

Eisner, E. (1987). Why the Arts Are Basic. Instructor, 97(5), 43-35.

Florida, R. (2002). The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It’s Transforming Work,
Leisure, Community and Everyday Life. New York, NY: Basic Books.

Freeman, E., Freeman, E. (2005). Head First HTML with C& XHTML.
Cambridge, MA: O’Reilly Media.

Friedman, T. L. (2006). The World is Flat: A Brief History of the 21st Century.
New York, NY: Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

Fritz, R. (1989). Path of Least Resistance: Learning to Become the Creative Force in
Your Own Life. New York, NY: Fawcett Columbine

Heathcote, D. and Bolton, G. (1995). Drama for Learning: Dorothy Heathcote’s
Mantle of the Expert Approach to Education. Portsmouth, NH: Greenwood
Publishing Group.

Jensen, E. (1998). Teaching with The Brain in Mind. Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Latzko, W., Saunders, D. (1995). Four Days With Dr. Deming: A Strategy for
Modern Methods of Management. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley Publishing
Company.

Margolis, J. Fisher, A. (2002). Unlocking the Clubhouse: Women in Computing.
Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

Medina, J. (2009). Brain Rules (T. Cutchlow, Ed.). Seattle: Pear Press. (Original work published 2008)
John Medina knows the brain. He also knows education. He does a nice job of bringing the
best of both worlds together in a practical, accessible and sometimes humorous writing style.

Negroponte, N. (1995). Being Digital. New York, NY: Alfred A. Knopf, Inc.

Perkins, D. (1998). Understanding Understanding. San Francisco, CA: Jossy-Bass.

Pink, D. A. (2005). A Whole New Mind. New York, NY: Riverhead Books.

Robinson, K. (2001). Out of Our Minds: Learning to be Creative. Mankato, MN: Capstone.

Robinson, K. (2006, Feb.). Video Presentation: Out of Our Minds from
http://ted.com/tedtalks/tedtalksplayer.cfm?key=ken_robinson. Monterey, CA: TED.com

Stiggins, R.J. et al. (2006). Classroom Assessment for Student Learning: Doing it Right
Using it Well. Published by Assessment Training Institute. (Includes CD-ROM and DVD)

Tufte, E. (2006). Beautiful Evidence. Cheshire, CT: Graphics PreLLC.

Tufte, E. (1990). Envisioning Information. Cheshire, CT: Graphics PreLLC.

Tufte, E. (2001). The Visual Display of Quantitative Information. Cheshire, CT: Graphics
PreLLC.

Tufte, E. (1997). Visual Explanations. Cheshire, CT: Graphics PreLLC.

Wiggins, G., McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by Design. Alexandria, VA:
Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development.

Zeldman, J. (2003). Designing with Web Standards. Indianapolis, IN: New Riders.

THANK YOU